In addition to lifting your feet off the floor...

skadanks

New member
Awhile back I made a post talking about my accidental discovery when I was a kid that if you lift your feet off the floor during turbulence, you don't feel it as much. Well here is something else I just recently discovered when things got bumpy on a flight recently. If you don't let your back touch the seat while at the same time keeping your feet off the floor, you will feel it even less. I'd say it reduces the sensation of turbulence by about 75%. I'm still not entirely sure how it works but it just does. Try it next time you're in turbulence, it's a god-send. Obviously this is a tiring position to sit in so I only use it when the turbulence seems to be at its worst and usually just for a couple minutes at a time.
 

mareducate

Super Lifetime Elite
And you can also try bouncing up and down in your seat while listening to music (real or imaginary). This really works! Do this as soon as you feel the first bumps and you won't notice the turbs. However, everyone else will stare and you run the risk of being professionally evaluated upon landing.
 

pinworm

Lifetime Elite
It works because it reduces the contact points between your body and the aircraft, which in turn reduces the signals your brain is getting about your position in space, so you precieve it as less bumps. It works even better if you close your eyes, eliminating another source of input.

But you get tired quick!! Lifting those legs up and sitting up makes you look hilarious and strains your muscles. On a longer patch of bumps, you will cramp up and get tired.
 

easr

Lifetime Elite
something I've also noticed is that if you can get horizontal, the impact of turbulence is less intense - which seems weird, since more of your body is in contact with the seat, but it has made a HUGE difference for me. of course, this only works if you have an empty seat next to you and if you are on the smaller side (I'm 5'2").

bopping around to music also helps me a lot as well :)
 

pinworm

Lifetime Elite
something I've also noticed is that if you can get horizontal, the impact of turbulence is less intense - which seems weird, since more of your body is in contact with the seat, but it has made a HUGE difference for me. of course, this only works if you have an empty seat next to you and if you are on the smaller side (I'm 5'2").

bopping around to music also helps me a lot as well :)
Or, if you are in a lie-flat seat in first class..even a biz class seat can get pretty flat.
 

elektrobank

New member
+1 for this. I was on a couple really bumpy rides last year and when things got bad I just cranked my iPod then started my bopping head and shaking my legs to the music like I was dancing in my chair. I may have looked silly, but I doubt that many people were really looking around much when the plane was shaking that much and it really helped a lot.

And you can also try bouncing up and down in your seat while listening to music (real or imaginary). This really works! Do this as soon as you feel the first bumps and you won't notice the turbs. However, everyone else will stare and you run the risk of being professionally evaluated upon landing.
 
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