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Thread: Pilot skills , Aircraft type, Seating position factors of turbulence?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    52

    Default Pilot skills , Aircraft type, Seating position factors of turbulence?

    First of all thanks for all the work you guys do here, and Peter especially. I flew BRUSSELS to MUNICH and the prediction was light to moderate, which one can say was accurate, rather light tho - no moderate - http://www.turbulenceforecast.com/fo...BRU-MUC-LH2293

    anyway, on the return flight I didn't post for a prediction, it was again Lufthansa but this time with a smaller E190 aircraft. (the other one was an Airbus 319 I think) in which I sat on the back of the plane..

    The turbulence prediction maps looked much much better, (only green and often nothing)

    the flight, although I can't say there was turbulence (there wasn't) felt generally more uncomfortable / less stable (if that word makes any sense) than the first one (in which there were some turbulence). The turns the plane did were more sharp, the attack angle during take off was also more sharp, the G were more intense, and worse of all, during the landing, when we descended below the clouds, there were several "gaps" of air that felt like the aircraft was losing suddenly height, and we really welt the G's.. (that was scary, you don't want that when you approach the ground I guess)

    What am I trying to ask.. Is it only weather or it's also the Pilot, the aircraft of how it handles the weather.. ? or my position on the plane played a role in how the flight felt?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Hi. Smaller airplane contributes a lot to be sure, and also being in the back is the worst place to be, as the tail tends to "fishtail" around. The best seat in the house is over the wing (think of a see saw). I'm sure the E190 handles differently. Of all the planes I've been in, I think the Boeing 757-200 handles the best. I do not like the way the A319 handles. My experience is a bit limited though. Probably as planes get a bit more fuel efficient, handling characteristics also change.

    Also could be luck of the draw, the maps are just a guide of what you MIGHT expect. What you get, is totally different.

    The drops during landing, are quite common, especially if it's windy, or if it's hot and you're getting updrafts/downdrafts.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seesaw

    Just the way it is.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Pilot skills have little to do with the turbulence experienced, save for their own judgement in finding better air over or below the assigned altitude but more of a factor is fuel calculations and permission to divert to a different altitude and when to ask for it. They cannot counter turbulence with the stick..even the autopilot can't, any more than you as a car driver can improve the quality of the road under the tires.

    Aircraft type varies, but not much across airliners in general. Big is not always better. In my experience, a big airliner like a 747 has much more of lumbering, longer divergence distance to turbulence that is more upsetting than a smaller jet like a CRJ, which catches less wind and diverges faster and sharper in turbulence. More startling bumps, but less sickening dropping and what feels like lower g's.

    The best place to sit is in the aisle seat over the wings. It moves less compared to the front and back, as the aircraft can "amplify" the motion from the center of gravity outwards...like the middle of a see saw compared to the ends.

  4. #4
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    I never thought of it that way regarding smaller vs larger aircraft, very interesting. Those lumbering drops aren't fun. I also recently experienced the legendary porpoising of an MD-90, quite interesting to say the least.

    Quote Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
    Aircraft type varies, but not much across airliners in general. Big is not always better. In my experience, a big airliner like a 747 has much more of lumbering, longer divergence distance to turbulence that is more upsetting than a smaller jet like a CRJ, which catches less wind and diverges faster and sharper in turbulence. More startling bumps, but less sickening dropping and what feels like lower g's.
    TURBULENCE FORECAST IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY OF THE INFORMATION FOUND HERE. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    Please read our forum rules and regulations before posting. By posting or continuing to browse, you agree to these terms.
    Donations are used to fund new features and to offset costs.

    Download our app: Turbulence Forecast for iOS
    Read the best book on fear of flying (e-book or paperback): Soar: The Breakthrough Treatment for Fear of Flying

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tb_neg View Post
    I never thought of it that way regarding smaller vs larger aircraft, very interesting. Those lumbering drops aren't fun. I also recently experienced the legendary porpoising of an MD-90, quite interesting to say the least.
    The MD-90 has something special?

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    TURBULENCE FORECAST IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY OF THE INFORMATION FOUND HERE. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    Please read our forum rules and regulations before posting. By posting or continuing to browse, you agree to these terms.
    Donations are used to fund new features and to offset costs.

    Download our app: Turbulence Forecast for iOS
    Read the best book on fear of flying (e-book or paperback): Soar: The Breakthrough Treatment for Fear of Flying

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