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Thread: Triggers and Remedies

  1. #11
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    Default

    On the mobile site, on your blackberry, you can click on the map. Once you click on the map, you can then click the track wheel, or press the blackberry menu button on newer models, and select full image. You'll be able to scroll around. You'll have no problems reading the numbers. Right and left is easier with a trackball model, but on the track wheel model, press and hold shift to go right and left.

    I have just added 'US Max Turb' to the mobile site, per your request. You might have to 'refresh' the browser to see the addition.

    Thank you for being a TF supporter.


    Quote Originally Posted by 747Fan View Post
    Do you know if there are plans for the "Maximum Turbulence Potential" page to be added to the Mobile Website? I do like that page, but given its size, I'm not sure if it will show clearly on the blackberry/cell phone. I know right now I have a hard time reading the numbers in the Potential Turbulence Areas page. Not a complaint, just a question.

    Thank you everyone for sharing your stories, please continue. They definitely help.
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  2. #12
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    Default Newbie

    As someone who craves information about turbulence, I was so happy to find this site!

    In regard to this thread topic: I was six en route on Lufthansa from Holland to LAX, I had flown three or four times prior. During our decent, I felt a ringing in my ears and an extreme dropping sensation. I still remember a horrified look on the flight attendant's face and also my mother's as the decent was much too fast and "steep." I cried my head off and just felt ringing in my ears for hours after landing. This one incident started a lifelong (so far) fear of flying, roller coasters, ocean motion, mountain driving, etc. I would not get on a plane from age seven to 21; I missed out on some fun family events. Since then, it's just a have-to riddled by pre-flight nervousness. I'm always seeking info as I still believe there's got to be a way to combat this.

    I now fly about four 1-2 hour legs per year, but like so many, will try to find ways around this. I used to drive from Seattle to San Francisco for business.

    Some random thoughts:

    * I wish the airline would pre-warn about the possibility of moderate to severe turbulence. I would gladly schedule another flight or even get off the plane.

    * Usually when I mention my apprehension to flying, someone will cite how safe it is. I see I'm like others here: it's about the sensation of turbulence, not that I think I'm going to die.

    * I recently tracked how many times I've flown since 1988: 104. Out of those flights, four made me very nervous, or could have been considered moderately turbulent. So now I play the probability game: 4% of the flights will be very uncomfortable, not so bad I guess.

    * Most importantly, there hasn't been one flight that I could not handle. Nervousness and a lot of positive self-talk yes. So the fear is the anticipation, not really during actual incident.

    * I state the positive, e.g., "I can handle it", versus the negative, "I am not afraid."

    * I yawn a lot and get sweaty palms a few hours before flying.

    * I used to check the weather days in advance, but then would be nervous up until departure. I guess this is a good thing to do since you can change the flight, but how many of us have the flexibility to do that?

    * There's no greater feeling than the seatbelt sign going off and the pilot giving a "we expect a clear and smooth ride ahead."

    * Does it really help if the pilot tells you four hours in advance that the landing will be rough? I rather sit in comfort for 3 1/2 hours, rather than worry all that time.

    * Ginger Ale (or Ginger tablets) seems to highly recommend.

    * Flying in/out of Las Vegas at night is definitely smoother than any other time.

    * You couldn't pay me to get on a prop, or even a small jet like Horizon. I will always pay extra for the larger plane. I've noticed that 757s don't really do well in turbulence. A32s do better than 767s.

    * Amazing how we can fret with fear, then look over at the little child who's giggling and having fun.

    * The consistent fear battle gets exhausting; unfortunately my dream is not to fly in peace all the time...it's to never fly again. I can't think of anything - done with regularity - which I rather not do.

    I will check this site frequently, thanks for letting me share.
    Last edited by Brave; 01-04-2008 at 02:52 AM.

  3. #13
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    Default

    Welcome, I am glad you found the site and enjoy it so much. As for this flight, is it possible there was a pressurization problem which required a fast descent?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brave View Post
    During our decent, I felt a ringing in my ears and an extreme dropping sensation. I still remember a horrified look on the flight attendant's face and also my mother's as the decent was much too fast and "steep."
    At least now you have the site, and also be sure to check the mobile edition at the airport at m.turbulenceforecast.com

    * I wish the airline would pre-warn about the possibility of moderate to severe turbulence. I would gladly schedule another flight or even get off the plane.
    I think this is probably a decent probability percentage.

    * I recently tracked how many times I've flown since 1988: 104. Out of those flights, four made me very nervous, or could have been considered moderately turbulent. So now I play the probability game: 4% of the flights will be very uncomfortable, not so bad I guess.
    Doesn't that conflict with what you said before?

    * Does it really help if the pilot tells you four hours in advance that the landing will be rough? I rather sit in comfort for 3 1/2 hours, rather than worry all that time.
    As a Michigan resident, Vernors is much better

    * Ginger Ale (or Ginger tablets) seems to highly recommend.

    It's amazing how much the desert heat makes a difference. I suspect early daytime is best, but night's probably ok too.

    * Flying in/out of Las Vegas at night is definitely smoother than any other time.
    I think it might have to do something with the length of the plane. The 757 is a long plane.

    * You couldn't pay me to get on a prop, or even a small jet like Horizon. I will always pay extra for the larger plane. I've noticed that 757s don't really do well in turbulence. A32s do better than 767s.
    You are welcome. Be sure and tell all your friends about the site!
    I will check this site frequently, thanks for letting me share.
    TURBULENCE FORECAST IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY OF THE INFORMATION FOUND HERE. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    Please read our forum rules and regulations before posting. By posting or continuing to browse, you agree to these terms.
    Donations are used to fund new features and to offset costs.

    Download our app: Turbulence Forecast for iOS
    Read the best book on fear of flying (e-book or paperback): Soar: The Breakthrough Treatment for Fear of Flying

  4. #14
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    Default

    You are correct that I contradicted myself. What I meant was that I wish I could get forewarned about turbulence while in the terminal or BEFORE takeoff while in the plane. If the latter, I would get up and leave if the doors were still open.

    However, once we're airborne, it's too late. In this case, I prefer not knowing about turbulence far in advance. Still a little contradictory, but in one situation I can remove myself, in the other, I can't.

  5. #15
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    I don't think they'd ever mention it, it would probably cause too many problems for the airline. So you just have to check the site instead. I did so for a couple years when going back and forth from DTW-BWI (or surrounding airports, depending on fares), and I dodged the bumps very well.
    TURBULENCE FORECAST IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY OF THE INFORMATION FOUND HERE. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    Please read our forum rules and regulations before posting. By posting or continuing to browse, you agree to these terms.
    Donations are used to fund new features and to offset costs.

    Download our app: Turbulence Forecast for iOS
    Read the best book on fear of flying (e-book or paperback): Soar: The Breakthrough Treatment for Fear of Flying

  6. #16

    Default My story..

    Is so similar to so many here that it is barely worth repeating. Grew up flying everywhere, all over the world. Never cared. Gradually grew fearful of turbulence. I had one bad flight, coming into JFK during a snowstorm where the luggage flew out of the racks and people were screaming. Oddly, I was pretty relaxed at the time.

    Since then, my fear has gotten worse and worse. I am on edge for days before flights, and its all about the turbulence. I also can't ride roller coasters and get nervous on mountain drives. I have three kids now and it is very difficult for me to have them or my wife see how stressed it makes me; embarassing and frustrating.

    I have tried EVERYTHING. Therapy, medications, a "hyppnotist to the stars" in brookline, Mass, self hypnosis, helicopter flying lessons. In the end, good old fashioned alcohol seems to help the most, and there are periods of time when it gets a bit better. One time I was seated next to a famous sports figured who I idolized and I chatted with him the whole cross country trip, ignoring the turbulence. Other times I am white knuckled even when the flight is smooth and stare out at the horizon to keep my mind calm.

    I have considered flying private, and have been offered some flights with super rich friends on their planes, but I turn it down because I fear a smaller plane will be more turbulent.

    I would give anything for...

    -- a drug that put me to sleep for the LA-NY flight before take off.
    -- someone building a plane where you can't feel turbulence
    -- an end to my irrational fears.

    Like most of you, I completely understand how safe it all is. It's just the turbulence. I've always wondered if it was related to balance, or an inner ear thing?

    Anyway, thanks so much for this site. Tomorrow I am flying back on my own and hear that it is rough out there, so maybe you can help me dodge the bumps. Thanks again,

  7. #17
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    Thanks NervyFlyer. Reading your post is like reading my own mind.

    One thought:
    I seem to be more nervous on less than 2 hour flights than on the longer ones. The former is short enough for nerves not to settle, so I'm on edge the whole time. It's hard to stay nervous for 10 hours. This might also have to do with the size of the plane, as they're obviously larger for longer flights. My sub wish: a 747 from San Francisco to Las Vegas.

  8. #18
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    Default Remedies

    There are a number of books, CDs, etc. on the market, are any of them effective? I've heard that therapies that stress finger tapping (or a wristband that sends a pulse) works.

  9. #19

    Default I wish

    I had known about the Vegas nighttime trick before last summer. I lived in Vegas for six weeks and drove back and forth from LA to avoid the hellish turbulence.

    One thing you guys (or gals) might want to check it out is a little device called The Stress Eraser. My wife bought it for me, it sounds like bull, but its quite helpful. Won a bunch of awards, including gadget of the year from Wired or Time or something. I've only used it twice, but it definitely lowered stress.

  10. #20
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    Brave, I merged your new thread with this one, as there is similar discussion about devices. The Stress Eraser does look interesting. I might have to get one and do a review. Below are two different links to the product.

    Stress Eraser 1
    Stress Eraser 2


    Quote Originally Posted by NervyFlyer View Post
    I had known about the Vegas nighttime trick before last summer. I lived in Vegas for six weeks and drove back and forth from LA to avoid the hellish turbulence.

    One thing you guys (or gals) might want to check it out is a little device called The Stress Eraser. My wife bought it for me, it sounds like bull, but its quite helpful. Won a bunch of awards, including gadget of the year from Wired or Time or something. I've only used it twice, but it definitely lowered stress.
    TURBULENCE FORECAST IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY OF THE INFORMATION FOUND HERE. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    Please read our forum rules and regulations before posting. By posting or continuing to browse, you agree to these terms.
    Donations are used to fund new features and to offset costs.

    Download our app: Turbulence Forecast for iOS
    Read the best book on fear of flying (e-book or paperback): Soar: The Breakthrough Treatment for Fear of Flying

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